What is the ThinkerShield?

The ThinkerShield for Arduino is a learn-by-making product from The Lab at the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sydney, Australia.

The ThinkerShield plugs in to a standard Arduino board giving quick access to the exciting world of electronics and computer control to anyone with a computer and a USB cable. No need for any wiring or soldering or previous program knowledge.

This makes it an ideal tool for curious individuals, STEM and STEAM students and educators to get started with physical computing.

With six green LEDs, a buzzer, potentiometer, pushbutton and light sensor built in, the ThinkerShield has plenty of onboard fun. Then, when you are ready to move on to bigger things, the ThinkerShield has lots of built‑in external connectors that make it easy for you to connect all manner of devices like switches, lights, motors and sensors — so you can start controlling the world.

What is the ThinkerShield?

We learned-by-making too

Prototype — Thinker 1
Designed to remove the need for a breadboard normally used with Arduino microcontrollers. Built in-house at MAAS with the prototype going through several redesigns to suit education market.

We learned-by-making too

Thinker1 Mark I
Over 500 of the Thinker1 boards were made with the majority ending up in the hands of young learners in MAAS holiday programs.

Scouts version

After seeing our Thinker1, the Scouts made their own version of the board. Yay open source!

Thinker1 Mark II
The board was redesigned to include additional features such as keyboard emulation. Experience showed that the additional functionality made it less user friendly.

ThinkerShield
In partnership with Freetronics, the board was turned into a ‘shield’ capable of extending the functionality of any standard Arduino board.

Our Partners

ThinkerShield education initiatives are proudly supported by:

Australian Business and Community Network
Crown Resorts Foundation
New South Wales Department of Education
Microsoft
New South Wales Education Standards Authority
Office of the Chief Scientist and Engineer
Packer Family Foundation
Western Sydney University